#61 Don’t be Afraid to Throw Things Away

Some things in life you will hold on to forever. You will treasure and cherish them at every age. However, as Americans and as people we tend to fall prey to the urge to hoard things. This is such a big issue that there is a TV show about people who hoard so badly they really can’t live their life. 

Today as you were throwing away your stuffed animals (again) as well as anything else you could get your hands on I got to thinking that maybe your idea wasn’t such a bad thing. I know that there are plenty of physical as well as emotional things that my life would be perfectly content with if I just threw them away. Do I really need those dead batteries that were just too far from the trash can to make it in? Do I really need to hang on to anger at someone I never see or deal with any more? Probably not. 

I want you to cherish things–memories, people, and the things placed close to your heart. Never get rid of those things. Just make sure that from time to time you open your eyes, take a look around, and throw away those things in your life that are just taking up space, building dust, and slowing you down.

 

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#60 Say You Are Sorry–Then Back It Up With Actions

I hear it on play grounds everywhere from parents of kids of all ages “Say you’re sorry” and I thoroughly believe that saying you are sorry is a skill everyone needs to practice. I also believe that the words can only take you so far. If you push a child down on the play ground, say you are sorry, then three minutes later purposely do it again–the words you used to apologize aren’t worth the breath they were spoken with.

Sorry is a powerful word when used correctly and you don’t need to feel guilty for your actions for your entire life. However, you do need to know that the more words you speak without actions to back them up–the less value your words and apologies will ever have. If you push a kid on the play ground and he falls, you should say you are are sorry, and then don’t do it again. As a matter of fact, if the kid falls down later you should offer him a hand to get back up with. Your actions just backed up your apology. In short, your actions give meaning to your words.

For the most part, people will forgive you when you say you are sorry–but it doesn’t mean they forget what you did. Sorry means that you realize you made a mistake and you don’t intend to do it again. I’m tired of a world of empty apologies and empty words. Pick your words carefully, admit your mistakes, and use your actions to give your words value and power—it will take you far!

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